Docker, Puppet and taking care of chaos

Out of many technical talks I have recently watched I am finding the one delivered by Tomas Doran at Puppet Camp the most impressing. You can find it here.

Despite the flamboyant presentation style (and silly hair!) – the topic of the talk is dead serious : what is the sane way to *consistently* rebuild your production environment which is made up out of many services? And by extension : how to make your Dev environment to match your production?

Tomas’s answer to this question is Docker and Puppet. I have already briefly touched Vagrant and Docker.

Docker is the new technology which is quickly getting momentum and it allows you to take all the code for your application and all the dependencies and build this mess into a Linux container which is portable across the platforms. From practical perspective you will have a single file (Docker Image) which you can create on your laptop and then deploy at thousands of nodes in the cloud as a service. If you have to learn one technical thing this year – make it to be Docker : Introduction to Docker

Puppet is extremely powerful and flexible management and configuration tool. It allows you to script up all the steps required to build your VM – all the packages that needs to be installed, all the directories which need to be created, all the sources that need to be pulled from github and built and deployed, all the config values that need to be set on your box. It allows you to define *everything*.

Tomas talks about how to combine Puppet and Docker together and never again have a need to log on to your Prod box to make a config change but instead make a change in Puppet script and re-deploy your Prod VM, in his words the VMs should be immutable.

And of course if you add Vagrant in this mix, you can also have you Dev VM to be built from the same Puppet scripts as your Prod making you Dev highly consistent with Prod.

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